Judy Berman

Jul 11 2012
itscomplicatedproject:

katiecoyle:

sociopathicdorito:

You have a wife and a daughter, Patton. 

This is what bums me out about my life as a woman in the twenty-first century: it’s not enough that rape exists; it’s not enough that women are so consistently blamed for their own rapes that even I, a fucking angry all the time feminist, sometimes catch myself wondering vaguely, when I read about a woman being raped, if the story is entirely true (and don’t think it doesn’t make me sick to my stomach to admit that, and don’t think that vague wonder doesn’t get shut down immediately by the larger and fucking angrier feminist side of my brain); it’s not enough that motherfuckers who never have been and, it is probably fair to say, never will be raped are so not sufficiently horrified by it that they make casual jokes about it to a crowd of strangers whose histories they cannot know, some of whose statistical likelihood of having been raped is pretty fucking high. What bums me out not more than all this but on some other level, some level of weirdly personal hurt, is to see people whose talent I admire and am inspired by treating said jokes like the fact that they are jokes (which is also, by the way, VERY DEBATABLE) automatically makes them art and thus untouchable? Like the people who object to these jokes are the assholes? I like Patton Oswalt and I like Louis C.K., too. I like Wes Anderson and I like Woody Allen and I love Tina Fey. I love jokes! That’s what hurts me. My love of jokes is, coincidentally, what makes me not like Daniel Tosh very much in the first place! I just don’t like jokes about this one thing, this one awful, unimaginable thing. This thing that should bum everybody out about our lives as human beings in the twenty-first century.
Let’s all try a little harder, okay? Start by not defending the telling of rape jokes. I promise your life will not be poorer for it.

What’s particularly rough about seeing people like Patton Oswalt and Louis C.K. defend Tosh is that they’ve made their entire careers on being really smart and even sensitive about complex social issues. C.K. in particular is so effective at probing constructions of gender, race, etc. by taking his jokes to the edge of taboo and then leaving us there to work out whether and why we’re offended. The fact that these two can’t find anything to empathize with in this girl’s story (not to mention that they apparently think Tosh is a funny enough comedian to defend) is really disheartening.

itscomplicatedproject:

katiecoyle:

sociopathicdorito:

You have a wife and a daughter, Patton. 

This is what bums me out about my life as a woman in the twenty-first century: it’s not enough that rape exists; it’s not enough that women are so consistently blamed for their own rapes that even I, a fucking angry all the time feminist, sometimes catch myself wondering vaguely, when I read about a woman being raped, if the story is entirely true (and don’t think it doesn’t make me sick to my stomach to admit that, and don’t think that vague wonder doesn’t get shut down immediately by the larger and fucking angrier feminist side of my brain); it’s not enough that motherfuckers who never have been and, it is probably fair to say, never will be raped are so not sufficiently horrified by it that they make casual jokes about it to a crowd of strangers whose histories they cannot know, some of whose statistical likelihood of having been raped is pretty fucking high. What bums me out not more than all this but on some other level, some level of weirdly personal hurt, is to see people whose talent I admire and am inspired by treating said jokes like the fact that they are jokes (which is also, by the way, VERY DEBATABLE) automatically makes them art and thus untouchable? Like the people who object to these jokes are the assholes? I like Patton Oswalt and I like Louis C.K., too. I like Wes Anderson and I like Woody Allen and I love Tina Fey. I love jokes! That’s what hurts me. My love of jokes is, coincidentally, what makes me not like Daniel Tosh very much in the first place! I just don’t like jokes about this one thing, this one awful, unimaginable thing. This thing that should bum everybody out about our lives as human beings in the twenty-first century.

Let’s all try a little harder, okay? Start by not defending the telling of rape jokes. I promise your life will not be poorer for it.

What’s particularly rough about seeing people like Patton Oswalt and Louis C.K. defend Tosh is that they’ve made their entire careers on being really smart and even sensitive about complex social issues. C.K. in particular is so effective at probing constructions of gender, race, etc. by taking his jokes to the edge of taboo and then leaving us there to work out whether and why we’re offended. The fact that these two can’t find anything to empathize with in this girl’s story (not to mention that they apparently think Tosh is a funny enough comedian to defend) is really disheartening.

223 notes

  1. we-will-find-you reblogged this from myeyestoserve
  2. myeyestoserve reblogged this from wildbynature
  3. dr-cormier reblogged this from stormqueen
  4. wayoutofbounds reblogged this from fygirlcrush
  5. mayadusenbery reblogged this from katiecoyle
  6. missalexus reblogged this from monalisasmiled
  7. trulymadlysusan reblogged this from foreverseenstar
  8. civilcervant reblogged this from like-being-here
  9. foreverseenstar reblogged this from ohvienna and added:
    I’m becoming super sad that many of my fave comedians are not seeing how fucked up this is. C’mon guys!
  10. itsbrittnybitch reblogged this from fygirlcrush
  11. monalisasmiled reblogged this from acrackintimeandspace
  12. jenna-renna reblogged this from fygirlcrush
  13. drearives reblogged this from roxanegay and added:
    lmfao hahaha
  14. roxanegay reblogged this from michelledean
Page 1 of 1